Three-Part Solution [USGBC+ Nov./Dec. 2015] | U.S. Green Building Council
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Published on
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Posted in Industry
Published on
Written by
Posted in Industry

This article was originally published in the November/December 2015 issue of USGBC+. Read the original version.

There’s a misconception about hunger in D.C.—one that suggests it’s only the homeless who use food banks. “It’s an expensive city,” notes Susie Westrup, LEED AP BD+C, manager, Paladino and Company, as well as Greenbuild 2015 Legacy Project co-chair. “There are [approximately] 700,000 people in D.C. who don’t know where their next meal is coming from.” The fact is, many working lower- and middle-class families visit food banks for supplemental groceries to make ends meet.

One of those food banks is the Capital Area Food Bank (CAFB), with headquarters in Northeast D.C.

This year alone, CAFB distributed 42 million pounds of food (the equivalent of 35 million meals) to 540,3002 people living in D.C. and six surrounding communities. Through direct service and a network of more than 500 partner agencies, CAFB feeds the hungry—though its mission goes far beyond the distribution of dry goods. To date, CAFB has implemented multiple measures aimed at nutrition education and skills training—all of which began with an onsite Urban Demonstration Garden.

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